A Grounding Recipe for the Luteal Phase

by | 21 Oct 2019 | Food, Menstrual cycle | 0 comments

I am not anti carbohydrates. In fact, I am not anti any food group. I believe they all exist for a reason. This brings me to my next point: Different reasons for different seasons. We have 4 phases:

  1. Moon time
  2. Pre ovulation
  3. Ovulation
  4. Premenstrual

Due to our continually fluctuating hormones and energetic changes, our bodies require specific nutrition and movement styles at different phases of our cycle.

The Luteal phase is also known as the PMS (Please Make Space) phase, is a potent time where the veils are lifting and we are becoming more intimate with our inner woman. From a hormonal standpoint Estrogen, Progesterone and Testosterone peak and then fall just before we bleed. PMS is a very common reality in a lot of women’s lives but it doesn’t have to be!

• Mood swings
• PMS
• Irregular cycles
• Fibroids
• Ovarian Cysts
• Cystic breasts
• Breast tenderness
• Cramps
• Heavy periods

I have found that by using my inner rhythms as a wise teacher and addressing any nutritional and hormonal imbalances I now live with my moon flow as my guide. My body as a compass and ride the ebbs and flows of what it is to be a woman with more grace.

So where was I? ah yes, the Luteal phase. This is a sensitive time. As we start to prepare for our moon we become slower in our physical energy and heightened in our emotional and spiritual awareness. We need to be mindful of taking self-care up a notch and saying no to situations and events that we would be better of taking respite.

Nutritionally speaking, our bodies benefit from warm foods & spices, vitamin A-rich foods such as yellow and orange foods, as well as foods rich in B vitamins and Magnesium such as dark leafy greens. Special shout out to the Brassica family and seaweed for their wisdom to balance our hormones and detox excess estrogen that could be contributing to our PMS.

It is also healthful to consume blood-building foods and hormone/ liver balancing herbs such as beetroot, dong quai & schizandra berry.

Adding roots like carrots, sweet potatoes, and turnips, are a rich source of nutritious complex carbohydrates. Instead of upsetting blood sugar levels as refined sweet foods do, they help regulate them. They also help your liver & large intestine flush out Estrogen more efficiently.

 

Why Eat More Root Veggies?

Long roots – carrots, parsnips, burdock, and daikon radish – are excellent blood purifiers and can help improve circulation in the body. Round roots – turnips, radishes, beets, and rutabagas – nourish the stomach, spleen, pancreas, and reproductive organs.

• Beets contain an abundance of antioxidants and are highly detoxifying.
• Burdock is considered a powerful blood purifier. This long, thin veggie is a staple in Asian and health food stores.
• Celeriac, also known as celery root, is rich in fibre and with a respectable amount of antioxidants.
• Jicama is crunchy and refreshing and contains a generous amount of vitamin C. It’s a favourite in its native Mexico and South America.
• Radish is an excellent source of vitamin C. It’s also rich in calcium, molybdenum, and folic acid.
• Sweet Potatoes contain unsurpassed levels of beta-carotene and are also rich in vitamin C, phytonutrients, and fibre.

Luteal Phase – Roasted Root Veggies

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 25-35 minutes
Serves 4 to 6

  • 1 sweet potato
  • 2 parsnips
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 turnips or 1 large rutabaga
  • 1 daikon radish (or substitute/add in other favourites, like squash)
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • herbs: rosemary, thyme or sage (fresh if possible)

DIRECTIONS
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Wash and dice all vegetables into bite-sized cubes.
Place in a large baking dish with sides.
Drizzle with olive oil; mix well to coat each vegetable lightly with oil.
Sprinkle with salt, pepper and herbs.
Bake uncovered for 25-35 minutes until vegetables are tender and golden brown, checking every 10 minutes to stir and make sure veggies are not sticking.

Tip: Any combination of vegetables will work. Roasting only one kind of vegetable also makes a nice side dish.